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Pocket Watch Photography

Bout Time Software

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Watch Specifications and Photography Notes

Watch #01. Waltham.

This is a Waltham Half Hunter Model 1882 Grade Royal. Made in 1891. The case is 18C Solid Gold by A.B with an enameled front dial and fully engraved.

Size is a 1S and has an outer diameter of 36mm (not including stem). This helps put the size of the object into perspective for you.

Watch #02. Elgin.

This is a Elgin model 2 in a Gold Filled fully engraved case by Keystone Watch Case Co. Made in 1911

Size is a 0S and has an outer diameter of 36mm (not including stem). This helps put the size of the object into perspective for you.

Watch #03. Waltham.

This is a size 16S, 7 Jewel, grade No. 610, model 1908 made in 1926. The movement configuration is Hunting (which indicates the stem is at the 3 position). This has a 3/4 plate nickle movement showing damaskeening.

Watch #04. An English Verge Fusee made by Robert Johnstone in 1793.

Pocket watches of this era were all hand crafted and usually by a single master craftsman. This is why they are usually all signed by the maker. It was a time consuming task for these early watch makers as they had to be skilled in all crafts, unlike the american and swiss manufacturers that relied on mass production of parts by 3rd party companies.

This watch is in a Sterling Silver Paired Case. That means there is an outer case of silver that protects the actual watch case.

Why Pocket Watches?

Pocket watches are interesting and complex objects that present many challenges. They include fine detail; round reflective surfaces; numerous small markings and hallmarks; moving parts and present the photographer with numerous composition possibilities due to multiple reflections all while still attempting to showcase the fine detail such as the watch movement.

It's those reasons which make watches a good photography test subject.

This was last updated on 19th of September 2019

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